When do you need to talk with psychotherapist?

Psychotherapy is a method of verbal communication used to help a person find relief from emotional pain. If you suffer emotionally or psychologically and feel that there is no solution, you should talk to psychotherapist.

There are many reasons why people come to therapy. Sometimes it is to deal with long-standing psychological issues, or problems with anxiety or depression. Other times it is in response to unexpected changes in one’s life such as a divorce or work transition. Many seek the advice or counsel as they pursue their own personal exploration and growth. Working with a therapist can help provide insight, support, and new strategies for all types of life challenges. Therapy can help address many types of issues including depression, anxiety, conflict, grief, stress management, body-image issues, and general life transitions.

Will psychotherapy work for you?

If you ready to work with your therapist – yes. What do we need to make psychotherapy works for us?

  1. Therapeutic setting – time for our meetings, place and rules.
  2. Therapeutic alliance – working relationships between therapist and client
  3. Content of the session – your ability to discuss your emotional world (like fantasies, dreams, problems, difficulties, mistakes, past experiences and a lot more). Of course, this ability may take time to develop, and that is perfectly o.k.

Every therapy session is unique and caters to each individual and their specific goals. It is standard for therapists to discuss the primary issues and concerns in your life during therapy sessions. It is common to schedule a series of weekly sessions, where each session lasts around fifty minutes. Therapy can be short-term, focusing on a specific issue, or longer-term, addressing more complex issues or ongoing personal growth. For therapy to be most effective you must be an active participant, both during and between the sessions.

What can you expect from my psychotherapy?

  • Relief from emotional pain, suffering, depression
  • Relief from emotional tension, anxiety
  • Relief from unbearable feelings (despair, lost of yourself, disappointment, anger, grief)
  • Understanding the core of your difficulties or problems
  • Understanding personality patterns and self-structure
  • Understanding relationship patterns and how relationship works
  • Understanding personal emotional reactions and its consequences on you and other
  • Getting real strategies for enacting positive change
  • Getting effective and proven techniques along with practical guidance

How can psychotherapy help?

Therapy provides long-lasting benefits and support, giving you the tools you need to redirect damaging patterns and overcome whatever challenges you face. Working with a therapist can help provide insight, support, and new strategies for all types of life challenges. Therapy can help address many types of issues including depression, anxiety, conflict, grief, stress management, body-image issues, and general life transitions.

Psychotherapy can help you:

  • Become more assertive, confident, and successful
  • Improve communication skills, develop you creative abilities, and discover your talents
  • Control your emotional states, improve your relationships and life style.

Is medication a substitute for therapy?

In some cases a combination of medication and therapy is the right course of action. Working with your medical doctor you can determine what’s best for you. It is well established that the long-term solution to mental and emotional problems and the pain they cause cannot be solved solely by medication. Instead of just treating the symptom, therapy addresses the cause of your distress and the behavior patterns that curb your progress. You can best achieve sustainable growth and a greater sense of well-being with an integrative approach to wellness.

Is therapy confidential?

The law protects the confidentiality of all communications between a client and psychotherapist. No information is disclosed without prior written permission from the client.

However, there are some exceptions required by law to this rule.
Exceptions include:

  • Suspected child abuse or dependant adult or elder abuse. The therapist is required to report this to the appropriate authorities immediately.
  • If a client is threatening serious bodily harm to another person. The therapist is required to notify the police.
  • If a client intends to harm himself or herself. The therapist will make every effort to work with the individual to ensure their safety. However, if an individual does not cooperate, additional measures may need to be taken.